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 Rank Insignia: United States of America

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Gunther

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Join date : 2010-09-28
Age : 53
Location : Boston, Massachusetts (USA)

PostSubject: Rank Insignia: United States of America   Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:55 pm

The United States Military uses pay grades, ranks and rank insignia to promote personnel and appoint to various postings of responsibility. I seek to recreate that here. Over time, ranks change, what they mean and the associated responsibilities change as well.

Enlisted Soldiers are considered EMs or Enlisted Members. Their pay grades are represented by the letter E and a number. Officers are considered OMs or Officer Members. Their pay grades are represented by the letter O and a number. Warrant Officers are considered WOs and their pay grades are represented by the letter W and a number.

US Army Ranks and Insignia


_________________
US Army 1982 - 1985
MOS: 76Y10
Units: 4th AG Co. (PP) & HHC 2/36 IN, 3AD

MA Army NG 1985 -2003
Captain, Infantry
Units: 2nd Battalion, 104th Infantry
1st Battalion, 104th Infantry
26th Infantry Brigade
HHC, 29th Infantry Division (L)

Deployments: Operation Joint Forge
Location: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Position: Battle Captain, Current Ops G3
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Gunther

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Posts : 124
Join date : 2010-09-28
Age : 53
Location : Boston, Massachusetts (USA)

PostSubject: Re: Rank Insignia: United States of America   Sat Oct 09, 2010 12:28 pm

Specialist - Can manage other enlisted Soldiers of lower rank. Has served a minimum of two years and attended a specific training class to earn this promotion. People enlisting with a four year college degree can enter BCT as a Specialist.

In the mid 1980's, the rank Specialist (E4) changed the name from Specialist 4 to Specialist. Some people mistakenly called it Specialist 4th Class, but that is not accurate. Also at the time of this change, the US Army did away with Specialist 5 (E5), Specialist 6 (E6) and Specialist 7 (E7).

Why does the Army have the Specialist and the Corporal ranks which both occupy the E4 pay grade? Specialist is considered a "soft" rank and Corporal is considered a "hard" rank. What that means is that Corporals are the lowest rank of the Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) Corps.


Non Commissioned Officer (NCO) - A non-commissioned officer is a military officer who is given authority through a commissioned officer, but he or she is not technically considered to be in command. Non-commissioned officers rise up through the enlisted ranks, generally with several years of experience to their names before they reach positions of nominal power. Both corporals and sergeants are often non-commissioned officers in many militaries, and depending on how a military is organized, warrant and petty officers may be classified as non-commissioned as well.

The non-commissioned officer corps is often regarded as the backbone of the military, because these officers play such a crucial role in day to day military operations. They serve as a liaison between commissioned officers and regular enlisted forces, for example, keeping their superior officers informed about issues and situations which might be of relevance. This aspect of a non-commissioned officer's role can be very important, as many militaries encourage an attitude of separation between officers and enlisted men which can make it difficult for officers to connect with the service members in their command. NCOs, as they are often called, also assist with a variety of administrative tasks, from filling out paperwork to assisting with scheduling.

For commissioned officers, a non-commissioned officer can also offer valuable advice and training with the benefit of experience. Many commissioned officers do not have extensive experience when they arrive to take command, although they may be very well educated as a result of their officer training. Therefore, having a good non-commissioned officer to rely on is crucial, as he or she can help guide a commanding officer through the myriad tasks involved in command.

Non-commissioned officers are career military, just like their commissioned counterparts, and they may rise to their positions in a variety of ways. In some cases, NCOs may join the military without the intent of reenlisting, and then become interested in long-term careers with the military which eventually lead them into a position as a sergeant or corporal. In other instances, people interested in a career with the military might not qualify for an officer training school, or they might be more interested in the job of a non-commissioned officer, so they pursue promotion from the ground up.

In all militaries, non-commissioned officers are easy to identify by their rank insignia. The precise insignia used varies, depending on the branch of the military to which someone belongs and the nation which he or she serves.

NCOs are leaders. The Army abandoned the accompanying Specialist rank in order to further emphasize leadership. During the time of the Specialist ranks it was thought that some professions within the Army didn't need to possess leadership ability, just technical proficiency in their career field. In the 1980's the army changed this and said that ALL NCOs are leaders regardless of the job they are performing.

In order to professionalize the NCO Corps, all NCOs must attend NCO Professional Development Courses. Corporals will become NCO's as long as they are pay grade E4 serving in a slot supposed to be occupied by a Sergeant (E5). While serving as a Corporal, the young NCO must attend Primary Leader Development Course (PLDC). To become a Staff Sergeant (E6), the Sergeant needs to attend Basic Non Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC). To be promoted to Sergeant First Class, the Staff Sergeant must attend Advanced Non Commissioned Officer Course (ANCOC). There is no course to become a Master Sergeant as the Master Sergeant is considered a "soft" rank compared to its counterpart, First Sergeant. The First Sergeant's School is required for promotion to 1SG. An E7 may be promoted to Master Sergeant until he has completed the First Sergeant's School. Finally, in order to be promoted to Command Sergeant Major, the senior NCO must attend the Sergeant Major's Academy. The Sergeant Major is also a "soft" rank as compared to the Command Sergeant Major.

During World War II, the Army used a rank whose title was preceded by the word, "Technical". You may have seen ranks that looked like Corporal stripes, but with a "T" below the stripes. This is a Technical Corporal. The same goes for Technical Sergeant and Technical Staff Sergeant. These are "soft" ranks and similar in definition to what the army changed to later when they created the specialist ranks.

_________________
US Army 1982 - 1985
MOS: 76Y10
Units: 4th AG Co. (PP) & HHC 2/36 IN, 3AD

MA Army NG 1985 -2003
Captain, Infantry
Units: 2nd Battalion, 104th Infantry
1st Battalion, 104th Infantry
26th Infantry Brigade
HHC, 29th Infantry Division (L)

Deployments: Operation Joint Forge
Location: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Position: Battle Captain, Current Ops G3
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