For Glory

Military Historical Fiction Play by Post Game
 
HomeCalendarFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Command Relationships

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Gunther

avatar

Posts : 124
Join date : 2010-09-28
Age : 53
Location : Boston, Massachusetts (USA)

PostSubject: Command Relationships   Sat Oct 09, 2010 12:46 pm

Following depicts what ranks are authorized to command/lead at each level. Generally speaking you can have a leader two grades below or one grade above the authorized rank for that level. This means that you could have a Corporal (E4) leading a squad if you are all out of NCOs of other ranks. You could also have a Sergeant First class lead a squad or a Captain leading a platoon. The standard is that when a Higher ranked Officer or NCO leads a unit, that he can only do so for one year and must either find a slot approved for his grade or take an administrative reduction. When you place a E4 or a E5 in an E6 slot, you either have the intention to promote the soldier or it is only a temporary condition.


A Commander is defined as someone appointed as a leader in charge of two to five subordinate units who has the sole responsibility for every person in his command and everything that his command either does or fails to do.

Subordinate Command is a lower echelon command that works with the Commander in order to accomplish his goals following the commander’s single unified vision. The Subordinate commander only answers to his immediate Supervisor/Commander.

Theatre is the region of the world where military operations are taking place. Depending on the size of the operation typically a General (O-10) will be theatre Commander. If more than five armies exist in theatre Congress may deem it necessary to promote a General to General of the Army (O-11), the highest ranking soldier in the Army. If a Theatre commander receives the promotion to General of the Army, then so does the Army Chief of Staff and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (echelons above reality).

One person can only be in command of two to five subordinate units. If only one subordinate unit exists, then no higher commander is required, the subordinate commander is in command. If six subordinate units are available then two commanders will be needed creating two newly formed subordinate commands to an even higher single unified command. Experience has shown that one person can safely and efficiently control and monitor the activities of no greater than five subordinate units. Therefore the numbers 2-5 are used in determining Command Relationships.

This model can also be applied to the civilian world in managerial relationships. If a company has several departments within their organization, two to five departments which work along similar lines can be grouped under one overseeing manager and so forth. A Regional manager may be placed in charge of two to five Retail outlets. If he is given responsibility for a sixth outlet, the work becomes overwhelming and his attention is distracted thereby providing substandard performance.

Let’s get back to the military Command relationships.

The US Army model of echelons (levels) exists as such:

Fire Team = 4 men with a Sergeant (E-5) leading. It could be 2-5 men.

Squad = 9 men with a Staff Sergeant (E-6) leading and two Fire Teams. The squad leader could control as many as five fire teams if needed, but maintaining two keeps it simple.

Platoon = 34 men with a Lieutenant (O-1) leading, PLT HQs section, 2 Machine gun teams and three Rifle Squads. The Platoon leader could control 2-5 squads but is typically organized with three for administrative purposes.

Company = 129 men with a Captain (O-3) commanding, Co HQs section, Anti-Armor section, mortar section and three Rifle Platoons. Again the Company Commander could control 2-5 Platoons. During Combined Arms Operations he could possibly receive a platoon of combat engineers and a platoon of armor to conduct a specific operation. A mechanized Infantry Company has a different number of soldiers available.

Battalion = 500 men with a Lieutenant Colonel (O-5) commanding, Headquarters and Headquarters Company and two to five maneuver Companies. The Battalion Commander may find himself with an additional Infantry company from another battalion and an armor Company to support a current operation thereby giving him control of five companies. A mechanized Infantry Battalion has a different number of soldiers available.

Brigade is a subordinate command that technically only has a Brigade Headquarters and Headquarters Company of 70-100 men. There is a Colonel who commands a Brigade. The Brigade Commander is given 2-5 maneuver battalions to command by his Division Commander.

Division = 10,000 – 15,000 men depending upon the type of organization the division represents. The Division typically has three maneuver brigades (subordinate Commands) which control the 9-10 maneuver battalions assigned to it by the Department of the Army. A Division Commander is a Major General (O-eight)

Corps = 2-5 Divisions as assigned by the Theatre Commander. A Corps will also contain a Corps Artillery asset which is of Brigade strength. A Corps can number as few as 20,000 soldiers and as many as 75,000. A Corps Commander is typically a Lieutenant General (O-9). This is definitely “echelons above reality”.

Army = 2-5 Corps will be assigned to an Army by the Department of the Army or Army Chief of Staff. An Army will have additional assets including an Artillery asset and many other Combat Service Support Assets. A General will command an Army (O-10). You will find anywhere from 40,000 to 375,000 troops in an Army.

Army Group = 2-5 Armies or 80,000 to nearly 2 million soldiers. Typically the Army Group is not used unless there is a major campaign going on. If a theatre command has greater than five armies available to them, the Army Group will be used as an intermediate command between Army and Theatre. The Army Group Commander is also a General (O-10) but due to command relationship he outranks his subordinate commanders at Army level.






If anyone has any questions on how Military units are/were organized at anytime during history or currently, please feel free to drop a PM. This is my lane.

_________________
US Army 1982 - 1985
MOS: 76Y10
Units: 4th AG Co. (PP) & HHC 2/36 IN, 3AD

MA Army NG 1985 -2003
Captain, Infantry
Units: 2nd Battalion, 104th Infantry
1st Battalion, 104th Infantry
26th Infantry Brigade
HHC, 29th Infantry Division (L)

Deployments: Operation Joint Forge
Location: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Position: Battle Captain, Current Ops G3
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gunther

avatar

Posts : 124
Join date : 2010-09-28
Age : 53
Location : Boston, Massachusetts (USA)

PostSubject: Re: Command Relationships   Sat Oct 09, 2010 12:48 pm

A major difference between the US Army and the USMC is the Marine Corps organizes their squads with three fire teams instead of two. A US Army Rifle squad consists of 9 soldiers and a USMC Rifle Squad consists of 13 Marines. The Marines also refer to the Lieutenant in command of the platoon as Platoon Commander rather than the Army's Platoon Leader.

_________________
US Army 1982 - 1985
MOS: 76Y10
Units: 4th AG Co. (PP) & HHC 2/36 IN, 3AD

MA Army NG 1985 -2003
Captain, Infantry
Units: 2nd Battalion, 104th Infantry
1st Battalion, 104th Infantry
26th Infantry Brigade
HHC, 29th Infantry Division (L)

Deployments: Operation Joint Forge
Location: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Position: Battle Captain, Current Ops G3
Back to top Go down
View user profile
 
Command Relationships
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Relationships & BDP
» AMF Patch & Pocket Badge
» Dr. Roy Walcott Davis
» One time donation or Ongoing Donor relationships needed...
» CVA and the Legion

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
For Glory :: Field Manuals :: The Barracks-
Jump to: